Taxes

Today’s column addresses questions about the potential to still take spousal benefits while delaying retirement benefits, how public pensions can affect spousal benefits and possible options when eligible for retirement and divorced spousal benefits. Larry Kotlikoff is a Professor of Economics at Boston University and the founder and president of Economic Security Planning, Inc, which
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“Invert, always invert.” – Carl Jacobi, 19th Century Mathematician A friend of mine who’s a fan of Charlie Munger recently talked with his son about his goal of making the high school basketball team. My friend asked, “What sort of things would you do if you wanted to be sure you won’t make the team?”
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Thanks in large part to federal aid over the last year, most state government budgets have recovered from the pandemic and many have surpluses that have prompted them to cut taxes. So far this year, 11 states have cut individual and/or corporate income taxes. Nearly all are Republican-led states with the exception of New Hampshire.
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Tax Notes chief correspondent Stephanie Soong Johnston recaps the historic agreement reached by the majority of the OECD’s inclusive framework countries on its two-pillar corporate tax reform proposal. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity.  David D. Stewart: Welcome to the podcast. I’m David Stewart, editor in chief of Tax Notes Today International. This week: two-pillar
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Bottlenecks are nothing new to the Internal Revenue Service. IRS issues with mail processing, return processing, and issuing refunds have been well publicized. Nevertheless, one of the most common IRS bottlenecks is one that many taxpayers, including many members of Congress, are unaware of. IRS notices about return adjustments, balances due, delays in refund processing,
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Famously, all children, except one, grow up. The child tax credit’s recent growth spurt highlights the question of what the near-term growing pains might look like as Congress begins to consider extending the advance child tax credit beyond 2021. The major issue for the credit remains whether and for how long the advance credit for 2021 enacted
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Celebrity Chef Mario Batali and his ex-partner are paying $600,000 for claims of sexual harassment of employees at Batali’s restaurants. Batali and TV food show judge Joe Bastianich’s $600,000 will be divided among at least 20 workers, New York Attorney General Letitia James announced. Batali was accused of groping and forcibly kissing women, among other things. After investigating, authorities
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People frequently tell me that they took a financial action at least partly “because it would save a few tax dollars.” Too often, a careful analysis of the situation reveals the action leaves them with fewer after-tax dollars. A classic case is the mortgage interest deduction. People often believe that owning a home with a
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Brooklyn Law School professor Steven Dean’s recent piece “A Plea to President Biden to Stop Perpetuating Racist Tax Policy” declares that failure to address racist domestic and international tax policies, like the disparities between the majority Black countries among blacklisted countries and tax havens such as Ireland and Switzerland, would prevent the fulfillment of President Biden’s promises to rid our nation of systemic
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           I’ve finally been able to travel and have had the opportunity to hear from CPA firms, small and medium business owners and tax-exempt organization managers around the country about their outlook for jobs and growth.  Most of the news has been heartening as businesses and tax-exempts look to weather the economic storm caused by the
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If you’re used to getting one refund check from the U.S. Treasury after you file your individual tax return with the Internal Revenue Service, you might be surprised this year to keep getting checks—or direct deposit payments. What’s going on? The IRS is still sending out third round stimulus payments, plus-up stimulus payments for those
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It’s very common for family members to become caregivers for other family members or help them financially when medical care or long-term care is needed. It’s also common for these families to leave money on the table by not taking all the tax breaks they could. The care could take many forms. An adult child
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Andrew Dana, a partner with Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP, discusses the Supreme Court case NCAA v. Alston; name, image, and likeness rights; and how both could affect taxation of college athletes. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity.  David D. Stewart: Welcome to the podcast. I’m David Stewart, editor in chief of Tax Notes
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